Top 10 WIFI Security Threats

4. Wireless Intruders:


Wireless IPS products like Motorola AirDefense, AirMagnet, and AirTight can also detect malicious Wi-Fi clients operating in or near a business’ airspace. However, truly effective defense requires up-to-date, properly deployed WIPS sensors. In particular, 802.11a/b/g sensors must be updated to monitor new 5 GHz channels (including 40 MHz channels), parse 802.11n protocols, and look for new 802.11n attacks. Furthermore, because 802.11n clients can connect from farther away, WIPS sensor placement must be reviewed to satisfy both detection and prevention needs.

5. Misconfigured APs:


Back when standalone APs were individually-managed, configuration errors posed a significant security threat. Today, most enterprise WLANs are centrally-managed, using coordinated updates and periodic audits to decrease TCO, improve reliability, and reduce risk. But 802.11n adds a slew of relatively complex config options, the consequences of which depend on (highly variable) Wi-Fi client capabilities. Prioritization and segmentation for multi-media further complicates configuration. The answer here: Combine sound, centralized management practices with 802.11n/WMM education and planning to reduce operator error.

6. Ad Hocs and Soft APs:


Wi-Fi laptops have long been able to establish peer-to-peer ad hoc connections that pose risk because they circumvent network security policies. Fortunately, ad hocs were so hard to configure that few bothered to use them. Unfortunately, that barrier is being lifted by “soft APs” in Windows 7 and new laptops with Intel and Atheros Wi-Fi cards. Those virtual APs can provide easy, automated direct connections to other users, bypassing network security androuting traffic onto the enterprise network. Measures used to deter Ad Hocs may also prove useful against unauthorized Soft APs, such as IT-managed client settings and WIPS.

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